Fisheries and Land Resources

Plants

Information Sheet Status Report Recovery or Management Plan Federal Recovery Documents
Barrens Willow Available PDF Icon (490 KB) Available External Link Icon Available PDF Icon (271 KB) Available External Link Icon
Blue Felt Lichen Available PDF Icon (174 KB) Available External Link Icon Pending Pending
Boreal Felt Lichen Available PDF Icon (788 KB) Available External Link Icon Available PDF Icon (947 KB) Available External Link Icon
Crowded Wormseed Mustard Available PDF Icon (492 KB) Available PDF Icon (276 KB) Available PDF Icon (315 KB) -
Fernald's Braya Available PDF Icon (1 MB) Available External Link Icon Available -
Fernald's Milkvetch Available  PDF Icon (665 KB) Available External Link Icon Available PDF Icon (344 KB) Available External Link Icon
Gmelin's Watercrowfoot Available PDF Icon (343 KB) Available PDF Icon Pending Pending
Griscoms Arnica Available PDF Icon (231 KB) Available PDF Icon Pending Pending
Long's Braya Available PDF Icon (712 KB) Available External Link Icon Available -
Low Northern Rockcress Available PDF Icon (822 KB) Available PDF Icon (172 KB) Available PDF Icon (2.3 MB) -
Mackenzie's Sweetvetch Available PDF Icon (218 KB) Available PDF Icon (476 KB) Pending -
Mountain Bladder Fern Available PDF Icon (681 KB) Available PDF Icon (2 MB) - -
Mountain Fern Available PDF Icon (487 KB) Available PDF Icon (481 KB) Available PDF Icon (1.1 MB) -
Northern Bog Aster Available PDF Icon (501 KB) Available PDF Icon (366 KB) Pending -
Northern Twayblade Available PDF Icon (929 KB) Available PDF Icon (2 MB) - -
Porsild's Bryum Available PDF Icon (479 KB) Available External Link Icon Available PDF Icon (359 KB) -
Rattlesnakeroot Available PDF Icon (418 KB) Available PDF Icon (441 KB) Pending -
Sharp Leafed Aster Available PDF Icon (161 KB) Available PDF Icon Pending Pending
Tradescants Aster Available PDF Icon (164 KB) Available PDF Icon Pending Pending
Water Pygmyweed Available PDF Icon (521 KB) Available PDF Icon Pending Pending
Wooly Arnica Available PDF Icon (165 KB) Available PDF Icon Pending Pending

Barrens Willow

Salix jejuna Endangered (May 2001)
Barrens willow, also known as barren willow, insignificant willow, and Belle Isle dwarf willow, is a dwarf, prostrate shrub with small, rounded, hairless leaves with a waxy upper surface. Barrens willow grows in a narrow band of limestone barrens stretching along the coast northwest coast near the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. This plant has never been found anywhere else in the world; it is one of a unique set of species adapted to the harsh climate conditions and natural processes that characterize the coastal limestone barrens of the Strait of Belle Isle. Barrons Willow

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Blue Felt Lichen

Degelia plumbea Vulnerable April 2015
Blue Felt Lichen is a large, blue-grey, leafy lichen that is fairly robust and clings tightly to its substrate. This lichen grows most often on yellow birch in moist sites, and more rarely on trembling aspen, white spruce, or rock. It has also been found on non-native trees. In Canada, this species is also found in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. In Newfoundland and Labrador, this species is known to approximately 24 locations on the Island within four general areas: the Bay D'Espoir area, the central Avalon Peninsula, Terra Nova National Park, and southwest Newfoundland. Blue Felt Lichen

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Boreal Felt Lichen

Erioderma pedicellatum Vulnerable (May 2002)

Boreal felt lichen is an epiphytic lichen that grows on trunks and branches of trees, mostly balsam fir. Its leafy thallus is gray on the upper surface and white underneath, and its colour changes to greenish when wet. The edges of the thallus curl upward, giving the lichen a unique, white-fringed appearance when viewed from a distance. Its distinctive fruiting bodies look like reddish-brown warts on the upper surface.

Boreal felt lichen is the only boreal member of an otherwise tropical group of lichens of very ancient origin. It is very rare in Scandinavia and Nova Scotia, and has recently been discovered in Alaska. It appears the species has been extirpated from New Brunswick, and the number of sites has drastically declined Nova Scotia. Newfoundland has over 90% of the known global population and the health of the Newfoundland population is pivotal to the survival of the species. This species grows in sub-oceanic forest regions of insular Newfoundland and is concentrated in two areas, the central Avalon Peninsula and Bay d'Espoir. It has been declining at all monitored sites in both areas. In addition, boreal felt lichen is sensitive to air pollution and can be an excellent indicator of air quality.

Boreal Felt Lichen

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Crowded Wormseed Mustard

Erysimum inconspicuum var. coarctatum Endangered (October 2006)
Crowded wormseed mustard is a yellow-flowered, biennial or short-lived perennial herb in the mustard family. It has narrow leaves and long, narrow seed pods. Mature plants can range in size from 5 cm tall to 75 cm tall depending on soil moisture and nutrient status. There is only one known population in Newfoundland and Labrador, between the Bay of Islands and Gros Morne National Park on the western coast of the Island of Newfoundland. There were about 100 mature (flowering) plants at this site in 1995. In August 2000 no plants were seen, but in 2009 approximately 20 plants were counted. Crowded Wormseed Mustard

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Fernald's braya

Braya fernaldii Threatened (May 2000)
Fernald's braya is a small, perennial plant of the mustard family. It has a deep taproot; a rosette of fleshy, linear to spatulate leaves; and erect, flowering stalks, up to seven centimeters high. Its four-petaled flowers are white to pink. The fruit is an elongate, usually hairy, capsule. It is generally smaller than Long's braya, with hairier fruits. Fernald's braya is endemic to the northwest coast of the Great Northern Peninsula, and is restricted to the narrow band of limestone barrens found along the coast. This plant has never been found anywhere else in the world. It is one of a unique set of species adapted to the harsh climate conditions and natural processes that characterize the coastal limestone barrens of the Strait of Belle Isle. Fernald's Braya

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Fernald's Milk-Vetch

Astragalus robbinsii var. fernaldii Vulnerable (April 1997)
Fernald's milk-vetch is a perennial, herbaceous plant that grows in small clumps. It is a member of the pea and bean family. Its alternate leaves are compound, with nine to 17 hairy leaflets. Flowering stalks borne along the stem bear 10-20 small flowers, which are purple to lilac in colour and fruit that is a hairy and on a short stalk. Fernald's milk-vetch is known to occur only from the Strait of Belle Isle region of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Most of its known population occurs in the Blanc Sablon area of Québec and the adjacent area of southeastern Labrador. A recently rediscovered, disjunct population of milk-vetch from the highlands of St. John on the Northern Peninsula is now thought to be the closely related Robbins' milk-vetch. Fernald's milk-vetch grows in exposed, calcareous habitats with low heath vegetation. Ferald's Milkvetch

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Gmelin's Watercrowfoot

Ranunculus gmelinii Endangered April 2015
Gmelin's Watercrowfoot is a small aquatic plant of shallow river backwaters with a muddy bottom. Its leaves form mats underwater and its small, yellow buttercup-like flowers project out of the water. In Newfoundland and Labrador, it is known from only one location on the west coast of the Island near the Robinson's River. Gmelin's Watercrowfoot

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Griscom's Arnica

Arnica griscomii subsp. griscomii Endangered April 2015
Griscom's Arnica is a member of the sunflower family with toothed oval to egg-shaped leaves and produces one single yellow, daisy-like flower head per stem. It is most often found on limestone on ledges of partially shaded cliffs. This subspecies is endemic to the Gulf of St. Lawrence region and is found only on the Island of Newfoundland and in Québec. In Newfoundland and Labrador, it is known to occur at only three locations on the west coast of the Island. Griscom's Arnica

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Long's Braya

Braya longii Endangered (May 2000)
Long's braya is a small perennial plant that is a member of the mustard family. It has a deep taproot, a rosette of fleshy, linear leaves, and erect flowering stalks up to 10 cm high. Its four-petalled flowers are white with a tinge of violet. The fruit is an elongate, usually hairless, capsule. Long's braya is endemic to the northwest coast of the Great Northern Peninsula, and is restricted to several small populations in a narrow band of limestone barrens found along the coast. This plant has never been found anywhere else in the world. It is one of a unique set of species adapted to the harsh climate conditions and natural processes that characterize the coastal limestone barrens of the Strait of Belle Isle. Long's Braya

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Low Northern Rockcress

Neotorularia humilis (= Braya humilis) Endangered (October 2004)
Low northern rockcress is a small, perennial herbaceous plant in the mustard family. It grows to about 10 cm tall and has small white flowers. Unlike the two braya species, to which it is closely related, the flower stalks can be branched. The low northern rockcress was discovered in Newfoundland in 1914 and is still only known from one location on the west coast of the island, where it lives on limestone barrens found on exposed mountain ridges. Low Northern Rockcrest

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Mackenzie's Sweetvetch

Hedysarum boreale subsp. mackenzii Endangered (May 2010)
Mackenzie's sweetvetch is a perennial plant of the pea family. It irregular shaped, pea-like purple flowers are sweet scented and occur in small clusters. In the province of Newfoundland and Labrador Mackenzie's sweetvetch is only found at two sites separated by about 7 km on the west coast of the Port au Port Peninsula. It is restricted to open limestone barrens. A total of approximately 300 to 1000 individuals is estimated to occur at the two sites. MacKenzie's Sweetvetch

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Mountain Bladder Fern

Cystopteris montana Endangered (June 2016)

Mountain Bladder Fern is a low-growing fern with triangular leaves up to 30 centimeters tall that arise from growing tips of long, thin underground stems. This fern grows on the ground in wet woodlands or along watercourses, and occurs in the cool climates of North America, Greenland, Europe and the high mountain areas of central and eastern Asia.

Mountain Bladder Fern is thought to be rare due to low reproductive rates and poor establishment success. Only one Mountain Bladder Fern site is known on the Island of Newfoundland. It is located on the Great Northern Peninsula, on the eastern side of Yankee Point, at the edge of the community of Savage Cove. Mountain Bladder Fern was first discovered in 1924 and was still found at the site in 2007.

Mountain Fern

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Mountain Fern

Thelypteris quelpaertensis Vulnerable (October 2006)
The mountain fern can reach heights of 75 cm. It produces stolons and forms large colonies by vegetative reproduction. It is found in moist, open subalpine meadows, beside lake shores, brooks, and springs. The only population in Canada east of the Rockies is found in western Newfoundland, on the Long Range plateau within Gros Morne National Park. Mountain Fern

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Northern Bog Aster

Symphyotrichum boreale Endangered (May 2010)
The northern bog aster is a member of the Aster family that can reach heights of 80 cm and has white to pale bluish flowers arranged in a short, broad cluster. The only known location for this species in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador is a fen at Wild Cove, near Corner Brook. The population is estimated to be between several hundred individuals. Northern Bog Aster

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Northern Twayblade

Listera borealis Endangered (June 2016)
Northern Twayblade is a small, less than 20 cm high perennial orchid with one small pair of oval to egg-shaped leaves that are directly attached to the stem without a leaf stalk. In this province, Northern Twayblade is currently known to only two small locations on the Island of Newfoundland: Lomond, in Gros Morne National Park and at Eddie's Cove East, where it was recently discovered. The total population in the province is estimated at a maximum of 81 mature plants. Northern Bog Aster

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Porsild's Bryum

Mielichhoferia macrocarpa (=Bryum porsildii) Threatened (November 2003)
Porsild's bryum is a tiny moss occurring mostly in arctic or alpine climates. The six known locations in our province are all clustered near the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula and represent just over half of the Canadian total. Populations are scattered colonies on rock faces which can, at times be unstable. It is possible for rock slides to destroy an entire population. Porsild's Bryum

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Rattlesnakeroot

Prenanthes racemosa Endangered (2010)
Rattlesnakeroot is a perennial plant with drooping pink, purplish or white flowers. The stem secrets a milky juice. The only known location for this species in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador is a fen at Wild Cove, near Corner Brook. The total population is estimated at several hundred to several thousand individuals. Rattlesnakeroot

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Sharpleaf Aster

Oclemena acuminata Threatened April 2015
Sharpleaf Aster is an inconspicuous white-flowered aster with upper leaves that are found in a whorl distributed around the stem. This plant flowers in late summer and early fall. Sharpleaf Aster is found in shaded woodland habitats. In Newfoundland and Labrador, it is only currently known from J.T. Cheeseman Provincial Park. Sharpleaf Aster

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Tradescant's Aster

Symphyotrichum tradescantii Threatened April 2015
Tradescant's Aster is a small, perennial aster with an open, branched flower cluster that produces five to six small, white daisy-like flower heads. It is a plant of shoreline habitats that can survive periods of complete inundation in wet years. The species is endemic to eastern North America and also occurs in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Québec. In Newfoundland and Labrador there is only one known current location on the west coast of the Island, near the head of St. George's Bay. Tradescant's Aster

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Water Pygmyweed

Tillaea aquatica Vulnerable April 2015
Water Pygmyweed is a tiny semi-aquatic, succulent annual plant that often grows in mats; the plants are so small that 1,000 individuals could grow within a square meter. It often appears reddish in colour and produces tiny white flowers. This species grows on sandy shores of rivers or ponds and sandy margins of vernal pools in coastal areas with a distinct marine influence. This species has been recorded in other provinces. In Newfoundland and Labrador, there are six known locations of Water Pygmyweed on the Avalon and Burin Peninsulas. Water Pygmyweed

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Wooly Arnica

Arnica angustifolia subsp. tomentosa Endangered April 2015
Wooly Arnica is a member of the sunflower and produces one single yellow daisy-like flower head per stem. It has long, narrow leaves and the entire plant is covered with wooly hairs. The species most often grows in small clusters on limestone and has limited ability to multiply or colonize new areas. In Newfoundland and Labrador, it is currently known to only two locations near Port au Choix and the western Port au Port Peninsula. Wooly Arnica

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